Christmas Dinner(s)

It seems necessary to update you all on what we ate for our actual Christmas dinner. The pictures won’t do it justice, but if you really want to experience it with us, rub a mixture of oil, dirt, and curry powder on your hands, scent the air with a mixture of camel and kerosene, play a recording of cows grunting and digesting, and hunker down for a feed. Anyway, let’s start with breakfast:

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Toast, masala omlettes, and endless cups of chai on the roof of our ancient guesthouse.

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Lunch: Paneer tikka, Chicken tikka, and naan. It wasn’t turkey, but it was a smoky slice of paradise. It haunts my dreams.

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And finally, dinner. Malai kofta, aloo gobhi, and more naan. My face expresses exactly what I was feeling at this moment. The meal may have been followed with an Indian sweet – the perfect sugar bomb chaser.

Food wise, the day was a winner. On another note, it was actually really neat to experience Christmas in the dessert – the ancient buildings, dusty streets, and livestock made it easier to picture what it must have been like for Mary and Joseph in Bethlehem. I cannot imagine giving birth to anything in Jaisalmer, let alone Jesus. A fresh perspective, in between all the naan.

5 thoughts on “Christmas Dinner(s)

  1. If a vendor near the fort asks you why I failed to return to see the rest of his plentiful carpet inventory, please make up an excuse for me. Also, avoid the carpet vendor near the fort. Merry Christmas!

  2. That food looks delicious and it all sounds lovely and exotic, especially from our perspective of -20s weather and everything else that comes with our Canadian Christmas. Good choice of holiday location!

  3. Interesting insight re: Mary and Jesus. That’s really cool, and I’m glad you were able to find some unexpected Biblio-empathic experience! (Biblio in the Bible sense, not in the general book sense).

    • It was actually kind of profound. While I missed our Canadian idea of Christmas, I’ve never felt more geographically connected to Jesus’ birth. It was rather profound.

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